Running fuel….

imageWow….these pancakes look yummy. Eating wheat and dairy free is becoming so much easier. Even in the short time we have been following this diet I have noticed a difference.

Ingredients are more accessible, every supermarket has a ‘free from’ aisle….even the Co-Op! And sports, health a nutrition fanatics are all taking on wheat and dairy free as ‘clean living’.

I just like finding recipes that are great for the whole family. And super yummy.

I have just found these on Runners World!!! Might try them over half term :-)

http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/nutrition/coconut-and-banana-pancakes-recipe/12174.html

These indulgent pancakes make for a perfect post-run brunch or perhaps a hearty pudding for special occasions. They are quick and easy to prepare – you can even blend all the ingredients in a food processor. Banana is a natural sweetener, so there’s no need to add sugar, and the almonds and pecans pump up the protein power, giving a 3:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein – which is perfect for recovery purposes.

Ingredients

2 bananas
45g ground almonds
15g desiccated coconut
1 medium egg, beaten
1-2 tbsp non-dairy milk (use dairy milk if you prefer it)
Olive oil for frying
1 tbsp chopped pecan nuts
1 tbsp honey
Method

Mash one of the bananas in a bowl and stir in the ground almonds and coconut.
Beat in the egg, adding enough milk to the mix make a thick batter.
Heat the oil in a large frying pan and place four spoonfuls of the batter in the pan, keeping them separate.
Cook for 3-4 minutes until golden underneath, and then flip over and cook for a further 3-4 minutes on the other side.
Slice the other banana and serve on top of the pancakes, sprinkled with the chopped pecans and a drizzle of honey.
Bananas

A great food for refuelling – bananas are packed with carbohydrates and they’re rich in potassium, fibre and vitamins C and B6, which is needed for protein metabolism.

Pecans

Pecans are rich in heart-healthy monounsaturated fats and high in vitamin E, an antioxidant. They are also a good source of manganese, a mineral that plays a role in bone health.

Coconut

While it’s true that coconut is high in saturated fat, it is mostly lauric acid, a medium-chain-triglyceride that raises levels of ‘good’ HDL cholesterol and also has antibacterial properties.

Serves 2

Prep time 5 mins

Cooking time 7-8 mins

Vital statistics (per serving)

520 calories,
35g carbohydrate,
12g protein, 36g fat,
10g fibre

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